Low Fat diets don't work.

 I'm sad to say I can...so I really was interesterd in this information !
 
Dr. Mercola's advice here is right on !! Have you been buying those 'low fat' foods..that seem to have invaded our shelves?  This article explains how we have been duped into thinking those low fat foods are going to help us with our weight control..
 
Read on for your better health..be open to the facts about fat !!
 
 
 
excess fat I'
 
 

Story at-a-glance -

  • The British National Obesity Forum (NOF) report on obesity warns that the policy to encourage people to eat a low-fat diet is having a disastrous impact on public health
  • Key findings include: high-fat diets are superior for weight loss; calorie counting doesn’t work; exercise alone cannot combat obesity; saturated fat does not cause heart disease and meal frequency influences weight
  • Some dietary fats do harm, while others are vitally important for optimal health. Harmful fats that contribute to heart disease are primarily trans fats and highly refined polyunsaturated 

Anti-Obesity Report Calls for High-Fat Diet Recommendations

Caution: Your bias is probably making your battle of the bulge much more difficult. This is the bias you grew up with, that "everybody" knows to be true. Only problem is, it's been proven false. So get the new facts, claim your new skinny today, scuttle disease, and reclaim your life.

 

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Kelp or Kale: Is Seaweed a Superfood?

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Anti-Obesity Campaigners Urge Britons to Ditch Low-Fat Diets

The British National Obesity Forum (NOF) and Public Health Collaboration (PHC) report on obesity is a perfect example. The report, which is based on the analysis of 43 studies, warn that the policy to encourage people to eat a low-fat diet is having a "disastrous impact on health."1,2

Calling for an overhaul of official dietary guidelines, which they claim are based on flawed science that has resulted in higher consumption of net carbs and junk food, the report notes that eating healthy fat does not make you fat. According to Reuters:3

"The NOF/PHC report, entitled 'Eat Fat, Cut The Carbs and Avoid Snacking To Reverse Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes' ... said snacking in-between meals is what is making people overweight.

'The role of poor dietary advice has been ignored for too long. Specifically, the 'low fat' and 'lower cholesterol' messages have had unintended disastrous health consequences,' the report said."

According to NOF chairman Dr. David Haslam:4

"As a clinician treating patients all day every day, I quickly realized that guidelines from on high suggesting high carbohydrate, low-fat diets were the universal panacea, were deeply flawed.

Current efforts have failed, the proof being that obesity levels are higher than they have ever been, and show no chance of reducing despite the best efforts of government and scientists."

Key Findings

The key findings of the NOF/PHC report include the following:

Eating fat does not make you fat

High-fat, low-net-carb diets are superior to low-fat, high-net-carb diets for weight loss and heart health.

Calorie counting doesn't work

Calories are not created equal. They have differing metabolic effects depending on their source, so counting calories is useless for successful weight loss.

You cannot outrun a poor diet

Obesity cannot be conquered simply by increasing exercise as obesity is rooted in metabolic dysfunction that leads to abnormal energy partitioning.

Saturated fat does not cause heart disease

Saturated fat and cholesterol has little to do with the development of heart disease, and a new analysis of evidence from 40 years ago does not support restricting saturated fat. 

One of the original researchers was Ancel Keys, Ph.D. — the man who initially proposed the link between saturated fat and heart disease — and it's believed he was largely responsible for suppressing these damning findings, as they don't support his original hypothesis.

Only parts of the trial's results were ever published, leaving out the controversial finding that replacing saturated fats with vegetable oil had NO benefit on mortality.

While vegetable oils lowered total cholesterol levels by 14 percent after one year, this did NOT result in improved health and longevity, which is the conventional belief.

Instead, the research showed that the lower the cholesterol, the higher the risk of dying.

For every 30-point drop in total cholesterol there was a 22 percent increased chance of death. In the 65 and older category, those who received vegetable oil experienced roughly 15 percent more deaths compared to seniors in the saturated fat group.

The vegetable oil also did not result in fewer cases of atherosclerosis or heart attacks.

On the contrary, autopsies revealed that while both groups had similar levels of arterial plaque, 41 percent of the vegetable oil group showed signs of at least one heart attack compared to just 22 percent of those in the saturated fat group.5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12

Avoid foods labeled "low-fat" or "low cholesterol"

There's no evidence to suggest avoiding saturated fat or dietary cholesterol reduces heart disease or death from heart disease.

Meal frequency influences your weight

Excessive snacking is a significant contributing factor to obesity. To lose weight, you need to reduce your meal frequency.

I recommend limiting it to two meals per day, either breakfast/lunch or lunch/dinner, within a six- to eight-hour window each day. It's also beneficial to avoid eating at least three hours before bedtime to protect your mitochondrial function.

Commercial influences have corrupted public dietary guidelines

The report accuses the food and beverage industries of manipulating public health organizations and corrupting the dietary guidelines for commercial gain.

Why Public Policy Is so Hard to Change

As in the United States, the U.K. encourages people to eat high amounts of carbohydrates. While high-fiber carbs like vegetables are important for good health, net carbs (total carbs minus fiber; think sugars and starches) really need to be restricted if you want to optimize your health and weight.

The report has not been well received, however. Public Health England's (PHE) chief nutritionist, Alison Tedstone, Ph.D., called the recommendation to eat a high-fat, low-net-carb diet "irresponsible and potentially deadly," while Associate Medical Director for the British Heart Foundation (BHF), Dr. Mike Knapton, said the report was "full of ideas and opinions."13,14

The U.K.'s Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) called the report "a muddled manifesto of sweeping statements, generalizations and speculation,"15 and the British Association for the Study of Obesity (ASO) has gone on record saying it "does not endorse the content of the report as it contradicts current evidence ... "16 

This kind of backlash is to be expected. Rarely if ever is it quick or easy to make course corrections in public policy.

The problem stems from the fact that careers are invested in certain recommendations. Not to mention the fact that government organizations can rarely afford to admit they were wrong, since public trust is at stake. Industry interests are also at play.

Today's diet is a boon to the food industry, as the primary ingredients are far cheaper to produce and have a far greater profit margin than nutrient-dense whole foods. My recent interview with British cardiologist Dr. Aseem Malhotra addresses some of these concerns.

Latest comments

28.06 | 21:31

I will check this out next time I'm at the health food store.

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03.06 | 18:16

Interesting

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03.06 | 18:13

I'm going to try it!

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30.05 | 07:47

Interesting article...and I do like olives...so guess I should start eating more of them.

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